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Kellie Carter Jackson in Person

Join us on Tuesday, June 11 at 7PM as Kellie Carter Jackson presents her new book, We Refuse: A Forceful History of Black Resistance. She will be joined in conversation by Elizabeth Stordeur Pryor.

Register at Eventbrite by clicking here

About the Book

A radical reframing of the past and present of Black resistance—both nonviolent and violent—to white supremacy 

Black resistance to white supremacy is often reduced to a simple binary, between Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s nonviolence and Malcolm X’s “by any means necessary.” In We Refuse, historian Kellie Carter Jackson urges us to move past this false choice, offering an unflinching examination of the breadth of Black responses to white oppression, particularly those pioneered by Black women.  
 
The dismissal of “Black violence” as an illegitimate form of resistance is itself a manifestation of white supremacy, a distraction from the insidious, unrelenting violence of structural racism. Force—from work stoppages and property destruction to armed revolt—has played a pivotal part in securing freedom and justice for Black people since the days of the American and Haitian Revolutions. But violence is only one tool among many. Carter Jackson examines other, no less vital tactics that have shaped the Black struggle, from the restorative power of finding joy in the face of suffering to the quiet strength of simply walking away. 
 
Clear-eyed, impassioned, and ultimately hopeful, We Refuse offers a fundamental corrective to the historical record, a love letter to Black resilience, and a path toward liberation.

About the Author

Kellie Carter Jackson is the Michael and Denise Kellen ’68 Associate Professor of Africana Studies at Wellesley College. Her book Force and Freedom was a finalist for the Frederick Douglass Book Prize and the Museum of African American History Stone Book Award. She lives in Sherborn, Massachusetts. 

About Elizabeth Stordeur Pryor  

Elizabeth Stordeur Pryor specializes in 19th-century U.S. history and race. Her first book, Colored Travelers: Mobility and the Fight for Citizenship before the Civil War, is a social history of black activists who, long before Rosa Parks refused to give up her seat on a Montgomery bus, fought against segregation on public vehicles. Her essay, “The Etymology of [the N-word]: Resistance, Language, and the Politics of Freedom in the Antebellum North,” won the Ralph D. Gray Prize for the best article of 2016 in the Journal of the Early Republic. Her next project, inspired by the article as well as her teaching at Smith College, is a historical and pedagogical study of the n-word framed, in part, by her experience as a biracial woman in the United States.  In 2019, she gave a Tedx talk on “Why it's so hard to talk about the N-word,” which has over two million views.

Register

This event is free and open to the public, but we ask that you RSVP on Eventbrite by clicking here.

Event date: 
Tuesday, June 11, 2024 - 7:00pm
Event address: 
9 College St
South Hadley, MA 01075
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We Refuse: A Forceful History of Black Resistance By Kellie Carter Jackson Cover Image
$30.00
ISBN: 9781541602908
Availability: Coming Soon - Available for Pre-Order Now
Published: Seal Press - June 4th, 2024

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